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The destruction of historical sites during war has an impact on the identity of a country and its people.

By Ruby Becker

The destruction of historical sites during war has an impact on the identity of a country and its people.

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The reporting of any war naturally focuses on the human casualties but there are always hidden consequences from the destructive forces of conflict.

Ruby Becker explores the impact of war on identity, in particular, on Syria and its people in a two-part video story she produced as part of the Australia-Middle East Journalism Exchange.

Watch episode 1 here.

Watch episode 2 here.

 

About the Writer
University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT

University of Canberra offers a three-year degree in journalism and a separate major in sports journalism. Stories from UC appear first on www.nowuc.com.au

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