Labor candidate: time for change for young Australians

Labor candidate for Macnamara, Josh Burns.

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Labor candidate for Macnamara, Josh Burns.

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Josh Burns enters the 2019 election as one of the youngest candidates, at age 32. With current politicians being dubbed out of touch with the real issues affecting the younger generations, he aims to ensure that we have “more young voices in parliament”.

After witnessing a government that is stagnant in addressing the concerns of young people and the future of Australia, Mr Burns felt the need to enter the race for the seat Macnamara a the Labor candidate.

He was born and raised in Caulfield. After graduating from Monash University with a Bachelor of Arts degree, majoring in political studies, Mr Burns worked as a factory hand and a teaching aid. He then entered the political sector, working as a senior adviser to Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews.

The candidate acknowledges the need for strong climate change, LGBTQI+ and mental health policies. Mr Burns highlights how these policies under the current coalition government have been “completely unacceptable”.

The differences in funding for public and private schools has put education on the election agenda in Macnamara. Mr Burns says that the stark differences in funding are “wrong and unaustralian”.

In order to make up for this discrepancy, Mr Burns says that if Labor is elected it will “restore all the funding that was cut to public schools across the country and in Macnamara.”

In relation to the government’s decision to put Clive Palmer as their second preference, he believes that “Australians will not be bought by cheap ads” and he is confident that voters will be able to “make a decision on what they deem to be best for the country.”

In relation to immigration, Burns acknowledges “we need to bring more humanity to this debate” and how in the current climate we have individuals “being used as political footballs”.

Burns highlights that the ALP policy has been designed with “humanity and compassion” with the aim of “getting people off Manus and Naru”. Additionally, Mr Burns also says that the Labor party will aim to “increase Australia’s humanitarian program and create a community sponsored program” as well as “end temporary protection visas and the long time it takes for people to process them.”

Healthcare and hospital funding have also emerged as key issues within the seat of Macnamara. Mr Burns emphasises that the Labor Party sees it as “crucial” and he said that Labor will make sure that “families and people have access to health care”.

The seat of Macnamara, under it’s previous name Melbourne Ports, has been held by retiring Labor member Micheal Danby since 1998. But Labor’s hold over the electorate has slipped, which is illustrated by the increase in support for the Greens in Macnamara.

After becoming a father last year to his daughter Tia, it became apparent to the young candidate that to ensure that Australia continues to flourish in the future and to help future generations, changes has to occur, and if elected Mr Burns promises to push for the changes listed above.